Skip navigation

Category Archives: velvet underground

This is a rip of a Verve first pressing vinyl of the third album, in case you wanted that regular mix! -Ian!

Upon first release, the Velvet Underground’s self-titled third album must have surprised their fans nearly as much as their first two albums shocked the few mainstream music fans who heard them. After testing the limits of how musically and thematically challenging rock could be on Velvet Underground & Nico and White Light/White Heat, this 1969 release sounded spare, quiet, and contemplative, as if the previous albums documented some manic, speed-fueled party and this was the subdued morning after. (The album’s relative calm has often been attributed to the departure of the band’s most committed avant-gardist, John Cale, in the fall of 1968; the arrival of new bassist Doug Yule; and the theft of the band’s amplifiers shortly before they began recording.) But Lou Reed’s lyrical exploration of the demimonde is as keen here as on any album he ever made, while displaying a warmth and compassion he sometimes denied his characters. “Candy Says,” “Pale Blue Eyes,” and “I’m Set Free” may be more muted in approach than what the band had done in the past, but “What Goes On” and “Beginning to See the Light” made it clear the VU still loved rock & roll, and “The Murder Mystery” (which mixes and matches four separate poetic narratives) is as brave and uncompromising as anything on White Light/White Heat. This album sounds less like the Velvet Underground than any of their studio albums, but it’s as personal, honest, and moving as anything Lou Reed ever committed to tape.

-Mark Deming, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
The Velvet Underground-THE VELVET UNDERGROUND (1969)
mu zs
320kbps

Re-up, better bitrate of this indispensable box set. If you don’t have this, what’s your problem? I actually like the closet mix more than the regular mix of the third album. I know, what’s my problem? -Ian!

Does this five-CD box set feature an abundance of essential material? Certainly. It has all four of the studio albums released by the Lou Reed-led lineup, and a wealth of previously unreleased goodies. Is it an essential purchase? That depends on your level of fanaticism. Most serious Velvet fans have all four of the core studio albums already (although the third, self-titled LP is presented in its muffled, so-called “closet” mix), and will be most interested in the previously unavailable recordings, which do hold considerable fascination. The entire first disc is devoted to a drummer-less 1965 rehearsal tape in John Cale’s loft, with radically different, almost folky run-throughs of most of the important songs from their classic debut, as well as a song that only made it onto Nico’s first LP (“Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams”), and one which makes its first appearance anywhere (the Dylanesque “Prominent Men”). Other big bonuses include no less than seven outtakes from Loaded and other songs re-done by Reed on his early solo albums. And there are sundry other unreleased live and studio items, highlighted by a scorching live 1967 “Guess I’m Falling in Love” and the 1969 demo “Countess From Hong Kong.” There are also highlights from VU and Another View, longer versions of Loaded’s “Sweet Jane” and “New Age,” and an 80-page booklet. The thing is, though, that virtually everyone who’s interested in this material has already bought the four studio albums, sometimes several times over. A separate release of the two discs or so of truly new material would have been welcomed by the many fans who aren’t interested in paying for a five-CD box of stuff when they already have well over half of it.

by Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
The Velvet Underground-PEEL SLOWLY & SEE (1995 compilation)
mu df
320kbps