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Category Archives: ambient


Thought I’d organize these a little. They were spread out over the blog at different bitrates and stuff.

I don’t really need to sell you on these, do I? If you have never heard these, get I and IV. These are of course mindblowing, but my favorite of all Eno’s ambient stuff is APOLLO: ATMOSPHERES AND SOUNDTRACKS. Check that out, too!

DOWNLOAD:
AMBIENT I: MUSIC FOR AIRPORTS (1978)
AMBIENT II: THE PLATEAUX OF MIRROR w/ Harold Budd (1980)
AMBIENT III: DAY OF RADIANCE w/ Laraaji (1980)
AMBIENT IV: ON LAND (1982)
320kbps

Actually thought I uploaded these already. This is the ground floor for Tangerine Dream, the goto stuff. Before the digital 1980s film score stuff like LEGEND that I think irrevocably tied them to cheesy sword-and-sorcery imagery for an entire generation of would-be fans. -Ian!

Phaedra is one of the most important, artistic, and exciting works in the history of electronic music, a brilliant and compelling summation of Tangerine Dream’s early avant-space direction balanced with the synthesizer/sequencer technology just beginning to gain a foothold in nonacademic circles. The result is best heard on the 15-minute title track, unparalleled before or since for its depth of sound and vision. Given focus by the arpeggiated trance that drifts in and out of the mix, the track progresses through several passages including a few surprisingly melodic keyboard lines and an assortment of eerie Moog and Mellotron effects, gaseous explosions, and windy sirens. Despite the impending chaos, the track sounds more like a carefully composed classical work than an unrestrained piece of noise. While the title track takes the cake, there are three other excellent tracks on Phaedra. “Mysterious Semblance at the Strand of Nightmares” is a solo Edgar Froese song that uses some surprisingly emotive and affecting synthesizer washes, and “Movements of a Visionary” is a more experimental piece, using treated voices and whispers to drive its hypnotic arpeggios. Perhaps even more powerful as a musical landmark now than when it was first recorded, Phaedra has proven the test of time.

The members of Tangerine Dream continued to hone their craft as pioneers of the early days of electronica, and the mid-’70s proved to be a time of prosperity and musical growth for the trio of Chris Franke, early member Peter Baumann, and permanent frontman Edgar Froese. The three of them had been delivering mysterious space records on a regular basis, and their growing confidence with early synthesizers (the best that money could buy at the time) made them virtuosos of the genre, even as they kept things organic and unpredictable with gongs, prepared piano, and electric guitar. Rubycon has aged gracefully for the most part, making it a solid companion (and follow-up) to their 1974 album, Phaedra. The somewhat dated palette of sounds here never overshadow the mood: eerie psychedelia without the paisleys — Pink Floyd without the rock. “Rubycon, Pt. 1” ebbs and flows through tense washes of echo and Mellotron choirs, as primitive sequencer lines bubble to the surface. “Pt. 2” opens in a wonderfully haunted way, like air-raid sirens at the lowest possible pitch, joined in unison by several male voices (someone in the band must have heard Gy├Ârgy Ligeti’s work for 2001). Rising out of the murkiness, the synthesizer arpeggios return to drive things along, and Froese weaves his backwards-recorded guitar through the web without really calling too much attention to himself. The piece evolves through varying degrees of tension, takes a pit stop on the shoreline of some faraway beach, then ever so gradually unravels a cluster of free-form strings and flutes. The rest are vapors, your ears are sweating under your headphones, and the smoke has cleared from your bedroom. This is a satisfying ambient record from the pre-ambient era, too dark for meditation, and too good to be forgotten.

-John Bush, Glenn Swan, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
PHAEDRA (1974)
RUBYCON (1975)
320kbps

Even before Carlos knew of a film project concerning A Clockwork Orange, the composer had begun work on a composition (Timesteps) based on the book. It’s the best piece of music in the score (and one of the most famed in the early history of electronic music), fitting in well next to late-’60s minimalist works by Terry Riley as well as the emerging Tangerine Dream (pre-Phaedra). Carlos also pioneered the effect of synthesized vocals (known as a vocoder), and their eerie nature perfectly complemented scenes from the film. Much of the rest of A Clockwork Orange is filled with rather cloying synthesizer versions of familiar classical pieces (from Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Purcell’s Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary, Rossini’s The Thieving Magpie) similar to Carlos’ previous Switched-On Bach recordings. Still, it’s worthwhile if only for Timesteps. A Clockwork Orange was originally released as a Warner Bros. soundtrack, containing only film cuts (which edited Timesteps down from 13 minutes to only four).

-John Bush, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
Wendy Carlos-A CLOCKWORK ORANGE OST (1971)
320kbps