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Category Archives: 320kbps

This post is basically a complete props-giving to Flabbergasted Vibes. There’s like maybe ten music blogs I go out of my way to check frequently, and that’s one of them. Human, charming, and honest from a depth of knowledge that usually begets arrogance. -Ian!

A classic. An essential. A staple that your home should no more be without than rice, beans, or OxiClean products. And in fact in many Brazilian homes this album is just as common as arroz or feijão and is kept on the same shelf. (OxiClean, on the other hand, stays under the sink).

This album, the third long-player he recorded, was his first record for RCA, and features material ranging from 1958 up to its release in 77. The majority of tunes are written by him, some with cowriters like his old friend Carlos Cachaça. One exception to that is “Pranto de Poeta” written by Guilherme de Brito and Nelson Cavaquinho, with Nelson sitting in on the performance.

The record was produced by music writer Sergio Cabral. My first impression of this album, after hearing the first two released on Discos Marcus Pereira, was that it was too slick and overproduced. On subsequent listens I found it to be….. still too slick and overproduced. But I have to admit that it actually does not distract from the merits of the incredible songwriting and strong performances throughout. However, you can take a wonderful song like “Autonomia” and orchestrate it, open it with an intro on a (very well-recorded) grand piano, and it sounds beautiful. But you can also take it to its bare knuckles, like on the posthumous EP-length album “Documento Inédito.”

It’s up to the individual preference I suppose, but I prefer the latter. As much as the album might be over-produced, nothing is *ruined* here. There’s no synthesizers, or rocked-out drums, or any number of other things that could have been done to mangle it. Sergio Cabral’s intention, as insinuated in the liner notes, was to give Cartola the magisterial, kingly treatment and carinho that so many felt he deserved. And the record successfully does that. I hesitate to make such a broad generalization, especially as an ‘outsider’ to a culture, but if there was ever an artist and songwriter in Brazil who seems to have left virtually nobody untouched in a deeply meaningful, emotional way with his music, that would be Cartola.

Flabbergast

DOWNLOAD:
VERDE QUE TE QUERO ROSA (1977)
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DOCUMENTO INÉDITO (1982)
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320kbps

I admit, I haven’t listened to this one. You tell me if it’s any good.

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SO36 Club, Berlin, Germany. 7th November 1980.
Stereo.

“Just before we went on, [Tutti] said, ‘Discipline’ and we did it. Just made it up. And I liked the fact that there are actually records of us inventing something; you are actually there when it was actually happening.” [Genesis P-Orridge, Re/Search no. 4/5, 1982]

“A short high frequency ‘buzz like’ sound can sometimes be heard during these performances. This sound is present on the original tapes and was most likely caused by [the] presence of a nearby digital PCM machine during the recordings.” [Chris Carter, TG+ notes, August 2003]

Track titles from Funeral in Berlin. Some instrumentals on IRCD36/37 may have one of the following titles: Stained by Dead Horses / Zero’s Death / Nomon / Raudive Bunker Experiment / Denial of Death / Funeral in Berlin / Trade Deficit. Any help on this appreciated.

Track One (30’37”)

00’00” Introduction
00’52” Instrumental
10’29” Instrumental
16’37” An Old Man Smiled
25’06” Trained Condition of Obedience

Track Two (44’24”)

00’00” Trained Condition of Obedience (cont.)
01’43” Instrumental
10’36” Something Came Over Me “A song for people who wank.”
21’04” ‘Church Music’
26’42” Instrumental
33’20” Discipline
42’15” Wall of Sound
44’04” (Performance ends)

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More info on TG Live:
http://nonplus.desensitised.net/tg24/tg24guide.html
Wikipedia: TG Live

DOWNLOAD:
Throbbing Gristle-TG+: IRCD36 SO36 CLUB, BERLIN (LIVE 7 NOVEMBER 1980)
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320kbps


Stooges vinyl rips. First and third are rips of the 180g reissues of the original masters taken at 24/96 resolution. FUN HOUSE is from PBTHAL, who makes the best needledrops on the internet. This one isn’t offered on his site, though. No, I don’t have a special deal worked out. He was doing this for years before he started his blog and is only putting new rips up nowadays. FUN HOUSE is recorded at 192khz off a first pressing from Columbia. All are dithered to redbook standards and then converted to mp3 by me. Yes, they sound better than the CDs. Certainly better than the trash Iggy remaster of RAW POWER.

DOWNLOAD:
THE STOOGES (1969)
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FUN HOUSE (1970)
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RAW POWER (1973)
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320kbps

Heralded by many as one of the finest ambient works of all time, Steve Roach’s Structures From Silence is right up there with Brian Eno’s “Music for Airports,” and deservedly so. Originally released in 1984, Structures From Silence was deemed a classic almost immediately, but the contrast grew greater as Roach’s output did, and the sheer beauty and clarity of this recording became more clear with time; then the album became a bit of a legend after it went out of print. Projekt has done ambient, and music enthusiasts in general, a great service by putting this excellent and classic recording back into print. With this re-release at last Roach’s early work can be listened to, enjoyed and made available to the buying public at large, as well as a new audience and generation of listeners. Structures From Silence 2001 has also been re-mastered for better sound quality, thus creating an even more evocative atmospheric listening experience. This is an exciting recording from a wonderful era in electronic ambient/space music. The 1980s saw the advent of so much electronic and synthesized music, but finally one of the finest recordings of the decade has become available again for a new generation and a new time.

-Matt Borghi, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
Steve Roach-STRUCTURES FROM SILENCE (1984)
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This is a rip of a Verve first pressing vinyl of the third album, in case you wanted that regular mix! -Ian!

Upon first release, the Velvet Underground’s self-titled third album must have surprised their fans nearly as much as their first two albums shocked the few mainstream music fans who heard them. After testing the limits of how musically and thematically challenging rock could be on Velvet Underground & Nico and White Light/White Heat, this 1969 release sounded spare, quiet, and contemplative, as if the previous albums documented some manic, speed-fueled party and this was the subdued morning after. (The album’s relative calm has often been attributed to the departure of the band’s most committed avant-gardist, John Cale, in the fall of 1968; the arrival of new bassist Doug Yule; and the theft of the band’s amplifiers shortly before they began recording.) But Lou Reed’s lyrical exploration of the demimonde is as keen here as on any album he ever made, while displaying a warmth and compassion he sometimes denied his characters. “Candy Says,” “Pale Blue Eyes,” and “I’m Set Free” may be more muted in approach than what the band had done in the past, but “What Goes On” and “Beginning to See the Light” made it clear the VU still loved rock & roll, and “The Murder Mystery” (which mixes and matches four separate poetic narratives) is as brave and uncompromising as anything on White Light/White Heat. This album sounds less like the Velvet Underground than any of their studio albums, but it’s as personal, honest, and moving as anything Lou Reed ever committed to tape.

-Mark Deming, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
The Velvet Underground-THE VELVET UNDERGROUND (1969)
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Re-up, better bitrate of this indispensable box set. If you don’t have this, what’s your problem? I actually like the closet mix more than the regular mix of the third album. I know, what’s my problem? -Ian!

Does this five-CD box set feature an abundance of essential material? Certainly. It has all four of the studio albums released by the Lou Reed-led lineup, and a wealth of previously unreleased goodies. Is it an essential purchase? That depends on your level of fanaticism. Most serious Velvet fans have all four of the core studio albums already (although the third, self-titled LP is presented in its muffled, so-called “closet” mix), and will be most interested in the previously unavailable recordings, which do hold considerable fascination. The entire first disc is devoted to a drummer-less 1965 rehearsal tape in John Cale’s loft, with radically different, almost folky run-throughs of most of the important songs from their classic debut, as well as a song that only made it onto Nico’s first LP (“Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams”), and one which makes its first appearance anywhere (the Dylanesque “Prominent Men”). Other big bonuses include no less than seven outtakes from Loaded and other songs re-done by Reed on his early solo albums. And there are sundry other unreleased live and studio items, highlighted by a scorching live 1967 “Guess I’m Falling in Love” and the 1969 demo “Countess From Hong Kong.” There are also highlights from VU and Another View, longer versions of Loaded’s “Sweet Jane” and “New Age,” and an 80-page booklet. The thing is, though, that virtually everyone who’s interested in this material has already bought the four studio albums, sometimes several times over. A separate release of the two discs or so of truly new material would have been welcomed by the many fans who aren’t interested in paying for a five-CD box of stuff when they already have well over half of it.

by Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
The Velvet Underground-PEEL SLOWLY & SEE (1995 compilation)
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320kbps


Do I really have to sell you on these? I didn’t think so. Get ’em if you ever got anything here or ever plan to. They’re all the Virgin/Astralwerks remasters, and they did a pretty good job to my ear. Also, if you’re looking for his ambient albums, I uploaded them here and here and some other places I think.

DOWNLOAD:
HERE COME THE WARM JETS (1974)
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TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN (BY STRATEGY) (1975)
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ANOTHER GREEN WORLD (1975)
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BEFORE AND AFTER SCIENCE (1977)
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No one knew quite what to make of this L.A. band in the mid-’60s, which unbelievably included Ry Cooder, Taj Mahal, Kevin Kelly (later in the Byrds), and even Ed Cassidy (briefly) in the same lineup. They only managed one single on Columbia before breaking up in 1966, but they also got to lay down an album’s worth of unreleased material, which was finally issued over 25 years later. Their languid, bluesy, folksy sort of sound anticipated future recordings by outfits like Moby Grape, Buffalo Springfield, the Grateful Dead, and even the country-rock Byrds.

Their lone single and unreleased album form the core of this 22-track reissue, which features imaginative rearrangements of standards like “Corrine, Corrina,” an obscure Dylan cover (“Walkin’ down the Line”), rocking originals, a confident performance of Goffin/King’s “Take A Giant Step” (later Mahal’s signature tune), and nifty guitar interplay between Mahal and Cooder throughout. Overall, it sounds a lot more like it belongs in 1967-68 than 1965-66. This archival release has value above and beyond historical interest.

-Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
Rising Sons-RISING SONS FEATURING TAJ MAHAL & RY COODER (1965, 2002 compilation)
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The S/T is a rip of the first pressing MONO vinyl, WOW is from a reissue with bonus tracks on CD. I didn’t skip GRAPE JAM out of laziness, it’s just particularly not very good. Meandering jams, they couldn’t even give it away at the time. They even tried discounting it heavily if you bought a copy of WOW and nobody really cared. -Ian!

Moby Grape’s career was a long, sad series of minor disasters, in which nearly anything that could have gone wrong did (poor handling by their record company, a variety of legal problems, a truly regrettable deal with their manager, creative and personal differences among the bandmembers, and the tragic breakdown of guitarist and songwriter Skip Spence), but their self-titled debut album was their one moment of unqualified triumph. Moby Grape is one of the finest (perhaps the finest) album to come out of the San Francisco psychedelic scene, brimming with great songs and fresh ideas while blessedly avoiding the pitfalls that pockmarked the work of their contemporaries — no long, unfocused jams, no self-indulgent philosophy, and no attempts to sonically re-create the sound of an acid trip. Instead, Moby Grape built their sound around the brilliantly interwoven guitar work of Jerry Miller, Peter Lewis, and Skip Spence, and the clear, bright harmonies of all five members (drummer Don Stevenson and bassist Bob Mosely sang just as well as they held down the backbeat). As songwriters, Moby Grape blended straight-ahead rock & roll, smart pop, blues, country, and folk accents into a flavorful brew that was all their own, with a clever melodic sense that reflected the lysergic energy surrounding them without drowning in it. And producer David Rubinson got it all on tape in a manner that captured the band’s infectious energy and soaring melodies with uncluttered clarity, while subtly exploring the possibilities of the stereo mixing process. “Omaha,” “Fall on You,” “Hey Grandma,” and “8:05” sound like obvious hits (and might have been if Columbia hadn’t released them as singles all at once), but the truth is there isn’t a dud track to be found here, and time has been extremely kind to this record. Moby Grape is as refreshing today as it was upon first release, and if fate prevented the group from making a follow-up that was as consistently strong, for one brief shining moment Moby Grape proved to the world they were one of America’s great bands. While history remembers the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane as being more important, the truth is neither group ever made an album quite this good.

Between the time that Moby Grape released their brilliant self-titled debut and when their second album Wow appeared in 1968, a little thing called Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band happened, and for the next few years it was no longer enough for a band with some claim to importance to just play rock & roll, even if they approached it with the freshness and imagination Moby Grape displayed on their first LP. Bowing to the pervading influences of the day, Wow is a far more ambitious album than Moby Grape, trading in the latter’s energetic simplicity for an expansive production complete with strings, horns, and lots of willful eccentricity, best typified by the helium-treated vocals on the hillbilly pastiche “Funky Tunk” and “Just Like Gene Autry: A Foxtrot,” a woozy ’60s dance band number complete with introduction from Arthur Godfrey (the band went so far as to master the tune at 78 rpm on the original vinyl edition). While at first glance Wow pales in comparison to the instant classic Moby Grape, repeated listening reveals this album has plenty of strengths despite the excess gingerbread; the horn-driven boogie of “Can’t Be So Bad” swings hard, “Murder in My Heart for the Judge” is a tough and funky blues number, “He,” “Rose Colored Eyes,” and “Bitter Wind” are lovely folk-rock tunes with shimmering harmonies (even if the latter is marred by a pretentious noise collage at the close), and “Motorcycle Irene” is a witty tribute to a hard-livin’ biker mama. Wow lacks the rev-it-up spirit of Moby Grape’s masterpiece, but Peter Lewis, Jerry Miller, and Skip Spence’s guitar work is just as impressive and richly layered, and the group’s harmonies and songwriting chops are still in solid shape. While the unobtrusive production on Moby Grape showcased the group’s many virtues, those attributes are visible on Wow despite the layers of studio excess, which sapped the momentum and charm of this band without snuffing them out altogether.

-Mark Deming, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
MOBY GRAPE (1967)
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WOW (1968)
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320kbps

Rip of an first pressing MONO vinyl from Buddha Records. -Ian!

Beefheart’s first proper studio album is a much more accessible, pop-inflected brand of blues-rock than the efforts that followed in the late ’60s — which isn’t to say that it’s exactly normal and straightforward. Featuring Ry Cooder on guitar, this is blues-rock gone slightly askew, with jagged, fractured rhythms, soulful, twisting vocals from Van Vliet, and more doo wop, soul, straight blues, and folk-rock influences than he would employ on his more avant-garde outings. “Zig Zag Wanderer,” “Call on Me,” and “Yellow Brick Road” are some of his most enduring and riff-driven songs, although there’s plenty of weirdness on tracks like “Electricity” and “Abba Zaba.”

-Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

DOWNLOAD:
Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band-SAFE AS MILK (1967)
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320kbps